Weather, wind and activity on Bouvetøya (Bouvet Island)

The area where the Norwegian Polar Institute’s field station was located on Bouvetøya (Bouvet Island) has been taken by a landslide, report NPI scientists currently working on the island. Read their report from the most remote island on Earth.

Bouvetøya

Photo: Øystein Mikelborg / Norwegian Polar Institute

CEMP

Scientists from the Norwegian Polar Institute are now working on Bouvetøya on the international monitoring programme CEMP. Photo: Norwegian Polar Institute

This autumn satellite images of the small ice-covered island located between Antarctica and the southern tip of Africa showed that the Norwegian Polar Institute’s field station was gone but the weather station was intact. Scientists recently arriving on the island discovered that the area where the field station had been located, including the weather station, had been taken by a landslide out into the ocean.

The scientists from the Norwegian Polar Institute who left for Bouvetøya before Christmas have now established their camp in another part of the island.

Norwegian scientists have regular field stays on Bouvetøya to study foraging strategies and distribution of fur seals and penguins. The monitoring is part of the international programme CCAMLR Ecosystem Monitoring System (CEMP) for the Antarctic marine ecosystem and has high priority within Norwegian Antarctic research. The last time scientists from the Norwegian Polar Institute worked on the island was in 2001, but during the Antarctic expedition in 2003/2004, expedition members from the Norwegian Polar Institute visited the island briefly.