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  • ICE Ringed seals – 2nd (and final) field report

    We are soon on our way south toward Longyearbyen, weather permitting, at the end of a successful expedition, which is the last field work for this project.

  • ICE Ringed seals 2012 First Field Report

    The ICE Ringed seals project is back in Svalbard for a third and final season of tagging seals with satellite transmitters. 3 weeks in, the scientists have now completed fhe first phase of the 2012 fieldwork.

  • Seabirds - sentinels of our seas

    Seabirds have become the subject of focus and interest as never before for various reasons

  • Fieldwork on ringed seals and bearded seals complete for the 2011 season

    Scientists have spent some of their summer weeks in Svalbard, tagging ringed seals and bearded seals with satellite transmitters. Read about their experiences, and early results.

  • Equipping seals with satellite transmitters: The second field season

    Ringed seals and bearded seals are being equipped with advanced satellite transmitters, which will provide scientists with detailed information about the life of the seals and how they adapt to climate change.

  • Ringed seals in the Arctic Ocean

    Nine ringed seals are now swimming around with brand new, advanced satellite transmitters. One is already at 84 degrees North, far into the ice of the Arctic Ocean.

  • Ringed seal equipped with advanced satellite tag

    A ringed seal has for the first time been equipped with a new advanced satellite tag, in northern Svalbard.

  • Ringed seals and ICE

    In the ICE Ecosystems’ ringed seal project we will take a closer look at the ringed seals in Svalbard.

  • New pollutants increasing in Svalbard

    The levels of new persistent organic pollutants (POPs) are increasing in polar bears, glaucous gulls and other arctic species, while the level of “old” POPs like PCBs and DDT is decreasing in the Arctic, shows a new report by the Surveillance Group for the Barents Sea.