Expedition participants, ICE Fimbul Ice Shelf 2009–2010

ICE Fimbul Ice Shelf 2009–2010

All Participants

Behind from left:
Kristen Fossan, Lars Henrik Smedsrud, Ole Anders Nøst, Jan Erik Tollånes, Tore Hattermann, Kirsty Langley
In front from left:
Per Gunnar Gabrielsen, Elisabeth Isaksson, Helgard Anschütz, Harvey Goodwin, Anna Sinisalo

Ole Anders Nøst

Ole Anders Nøst

Ole Anders Nøst

Expedition and project leader

I am working as a physical oceanographer in the Norwegian Polar Institute. Physical oceanography is about the physics of ocean currents, about what is driving them… wind, melting of ice and so on… Since my master at the University of Bergen in 1992, I have been specializing on the ocean circulation and melting beneath Antarctic ice shelves. I have been with a ship as far south it is possible to get, down to the Filchner-Ronne ice front. The data from that expedition were used in my PhD about the circulation under the Filchner-Ronne Ice Shelf. This years expedition will be my third trip to the Fimbul Ice Shelf and my sixth trip to Antarctica in total. It is nine years since I last visited the Fimbul Ice Shelf and Antarctica, and I look forward to go there again. To study the ocean circulation underneath ice shelves is an oceanographers only possibility to do field work while being on shore. I like the combination of oceanographic field work and living in a tent on the ice.

Elisabeth Isaksson

Elisabeth Isaksson

Elisabeth Isaksson

Glaciologist (leader of the glaciology group)

As a glaciologist I work with snow and ice. On Fimbulisen I am going to investigate how the snow accumulation has varied through the last decades. In Antarctica snow fall is a sensitive climatic indicator and we will investigate this through drilling snow cores and digging snow pits.

I have been in Antarctica doing similar studies several times before, but it is now 15 years ago I was there last time. It is going to be fantastic to come back to the large white continent again – this time with so many female colleagues in the glaciology group. I hope my kids who are14 and 12 years old will be two of many kids that will follow the benefit from the Fimbulisen outreach-school program and learn about Antarctica and climate.

 

Harvey Goodwin

Harvey Goodwin

Harvey Goodwin

Responsible for glacier safety

I first worked on Fimbulisen with Ole Anders in 2000–2001 and together we know the ins and outs of Fimbulisen better than most. Since then I have been to Troll two more times providing glacier safety for the logistics. I will be making sure the other participants get up to speed on safe glacier travel and rescue techniques as well as reconnoitering potentially crevassed areas and securing safe routes through them. I also expect to be digging lots of snow for the glaciologists and look forward to Christmas in the midnight sun.

Tore Hattermann

Tore Hattermann

Tore Hattermann

PhD student

I enjoy the physics of the ocean and I would like to figure out how much ice will be lost to the sea if we continue heating up the planet.

Most of Antarctica's ice enters the ocean through floating ice shelves, which are melting from below. We will drill a hole through the 500 m thick Fimbul Ice Shelf and put our instruments into the water to record the ocean currents for an entire year. Afterwards, the data will be used to set up a computer model, which simulates the regional ocean circulation. With these simulations I want to answer the question how warm water reaches the ice shelf where it causes melting from below. Finally, I am very excited about getting my hands on the cool stuff that I yet have only seen on my computer screen.

 

Per Gunnar Gabrielsen

Per Gunnar Gabrielsen

Per Gunnar Gabrielsen

Teacher

I will be 62 years old at Fimbul, where my focus will be on the school part, on media, on all the couplings and tubes and on safety. I am educated historian, journalist, plumber and fireman.

On the far southern part of Gotland in the Eastern Sea I live with my wife on a farm with fields and meadows under a higg sky with ocean all around. Here I teach in a junior high school and enjoy life in many different ways.

Helgard Anschuetz

Helgard Anschütz

Helgard Anschütz

Glaciologist

I am a geophysicist-turned-glaciologist and like any decent glaciologist I have a profound interest in snow and ice: How much snow has deposited where and why? Or in other word, snow-accumulation rates and their possible changes are the main focus of my research.

To get a detailed picture of the snow and its whereabouts I will spend my time in the field with an ice-core drill, producing loads of holes. So while helping make Fimbulisen look like a swiss cheese we will hopefully bring home a lot of beautiful ice cores that can be analyzed in the lab afterwards.

I have been to Antarctica several times, including overwintering on the German base "Neumayer II" and participation in the Norwegian-US traverse through East Antarctica. Now I look forward to another field season and hopefully finding answers to some important questions concerning snow, climate and everything.

Kristen Fossan

Kristen Fossan

Kristen Fossan

Technician

After working as a technician in the Norwegian Polar Institute for twenty years and lots of work in the Arctic – this is my first visit to the Antarctic.

Lars H. Smedsrud

Lars H. Smedsrud

Lars H. Smedsrud

Researcher

I work on sea ice and polar oceanography. The last few years most of my field work has been around Svalbard, so I'm glad that we're going to Antarctica this time. Much of my work has covered freezing processes, how quickly open water freezes, what sorts of ice is created, and different sources of cooling and heat. I enjoy being outdoors, also when it's pretty cold, so the field work is the best part of my job. I also work with computer models of the ocean and ice, and do laboratory work.

For Fimbulisen I have done a model study, so I'm eager to discover what it is like in reality.

Kirsty Langley

Kirsty Langley

Kirsty Langley

Glaciologist

I am a geophysicist/glaciologist with a keen interest in exploring snow and ice with radars. Radar is a fantastic tool that can be used to investigate many different aspects of an ice shelf. The Fimbul Ice Shelf is floating on the ocean and so there is interaction between the base of the ice shelf and the ocean beneath. Anna and I will be using a very precise radar to measure the melt rates at this ice ocean contact by making repeat measurements at the exact same locations.

This will be my second field season in Antarctica. I am really looking forward to camping on the ice and to digging lots of snow pits for Elisabeth and Helgard.

Anna Sinisalo

Anna Sinisalo

Anna Sinisalo

Glaciologist

I am a Finnish geophysicist/glaciologist currently working in Norway.

Kirsty and I will be using ice penetrating radars to measure the snow accumulation rates on the top and the melt rates at the bottom of the ice shelf.

This will be my fifth field season in Antarctica but the first time spending almost the whole season on an ice shelf. I’m looking forward to work with my friends and colleagues in this exciting project providing new information about the status of this important area.

Jan Erik Tollånes

Jan Erik Tollånes

Jan Erik Tollånes

Mechanic

I live and work in Beiarn, northern Norway, as a mechanic. I have worked 5 years on Svalbard as a mechanic and I have 4 seasons in Antarctica as aerial fitter, mechanic, machine operator and transport works for K-SAT and the Polar Institute.