Expedition participants, ICE Fimbul Ice Shelf 2010–2011

This season, the ICE Fimbul Ice Shelf expedition will consist of six participants.

Stein Tronstad

Stein Tronstad

Expedition leader Stein Tronstad. Photo: Norwegian Polar Institute

I will be leading this season’s field excursion to the Fimbulisen Ice Shelf. My responsibility will be to take care of the logistics and safety considerations, to allow the scientists to focus all their attention on the more important tasks: to collect data from the ice and the ocean. To organise this expedition will be a practical challenge that I am looking very much forward to, and a pleasant change from my day-to-day work as section head at the Environmental Data Section of the Norwegian Polar Institute.

My professional background may seem somewhat unlikely for the endeavour; my university degree is in urban planning and civil engineering. However, I joined the Norwegian Polar Institute in 1997, and I will be setting out on my sixth Antarctic field season this year. Previously I have spent two summers at Troll Station and three on the Antarctic Plateau, including my participation in the two IPY traverses between Troll and the South Pole. In total I have spent more than a year in Antarctica; yet it remains impossible for me to decline another opportunity to visit this extraordinary continent. It never ceases to captivate me that this vast, barren place can offer such scope for imagination.

Kirsty Langley

Kirsty Langley

Glaciologist Kirsty Langley. Photo: Norwegian Polar Institute

I am a geophysicist/glaciologist with a keen interest in exploring snow and ice with radars. Radar is a fantastic tool that can be used to investigate many different aspects of an ice shelf. The Fimbul Ice Shelf is floating on the ocean and so there is interaction between the base of the ice shelf and the ocean beneath. I will be using a very precise radar to measure the melt rates at this ice ocean contact by making repeat measurements at the exact same locations.
This will be my third field season in Antarctica. I am really looking forward to camping on the ice and to digging lots of snow pits!

Johan Hustadnes

Johan Hustadnes

Electrician Johan Hustadnes. Photo: Norwegian Polar Institute

I will be the electrician and handyman during this season at Fimbulisen, and I will be joining Tore out to the oceanographic stations to download the data and maintain the instruments. This will be my third trip to Antarctica; following an overwintering at Troll Station in 2007 and one season as a field hand at the same place during the austral summer of 2008-2009. When the fieldwork of ICE-Fimbulisen has been completed, I will be continuing to work at Troll Station for the remainder of the summer, shuttling supplies from the ship unloading site at the ice shelf and up to the station.

My day-to-day work is in electrical engineering and electronics, and I am employed as a consultant by the company Enøk-senteret AS in Ørsta. I enjoy mountaineering and outdoor life, and the trip down to Fimbulisen will be a good opportunity to experience the magnificent scenery of Dronning Maud Land.

Kjetil Bakkland

Kjetil Bakkland

Mechanc og medic Kjetil Bakkland. Photo: Private

I will be the mechanic and first aid responder during this season at Fimbulisen ice shelf. After our thorough preparations I expect the medical challenges to be non-existent, so I will focus on getting our tracked vehicles to run smoothly and safely about on the ice shelf. This will be my fifth summer season in Antarctica. Previously I have been involved in the construction of the modern, full-year station at Troll, and in the great IPY traverse from Troll Station to the South Pole.

My normal work is with the Fire and Rescue Services of the City of Sandefjord in Southern Norway, as a trained mechanic and paramedic. I take a keen interest in Antarctic research and exploring, and I am looking forward to this opportunity to explore a part of Dronning Maud Land that is new to me. When the season has been completed, however, I will be looking even more forward to getting back to Norway, to my wife Lise and my kids Sigurd (2), Hanna (9), Steffen (18) and Marius (20).

Elvar Ørn Kjartansson

Elvar Ørn Kjartansson

Photographer Elvar Ørn Kjartansson. Photo: Norwegian Polar Institute

I am an Icelandic freelance photographer and film maker and have been living in Norway for the past 7 years. I have worked with the Norwegian Polar Institute previously in Ny-Ålesund, Svalbard, where I accompanied scientists in the field to document their work using photographs and video.This will be my first journey to Antarctica and I look forward to challenging my creative and technical skills in what promises to be an exciting and inspiring expedition to the Fimbul ice shelf.
 

Tore Hattermann

Tore Hattermann

Oceanographer Tore Hattermann. Photo: Norwegian Polar Institute

I enjoy ocean physics, and during my PhD I will be contributing to our understanding of how much ice will be lost to the sea if we continue to heat up our planet. Most of Antarctica's ice enters the ocean through floating ice shelves, which are melting from below. Last year we drilled three holes up to 500 meters through the thick Fimbul Ice Shelf and put our instruments into the water to record the ocean currents. This season we will revisit the drill sites to collect the first time series of data from an entire year. I do not know what will be more exciting: the time on the Ice or the exclusive dataset we are going to obtain. When we return from Antarctica the data will be used to set up a computer model to simulate the regional ocean circulation. With the simulations I want to find an answer to how the water which causes melting from below reaches the ice shelf.