Project participants: ICE Fluxes

Arild Sundfjord

Photo: Norwegian Polar Institute

Arild Sundfjord

Research scientist, physical oceanography, Norwegian Polar Institute

Upper-ocean vertical mixing processes are highly important for ocean dynamics on a wide range of scales. Turbulence affects stratification and ice melt and formation, and thus also contributes to the horizontal density gradients that are important for the large-scale oceanic circulation. In addition to vertical exchange of heat and salt, nutrients for primary production and dissolved CO2 are among the other important constituents that are affected by varying vertical mixing driven by wind, tidal current shear, internal waves etc.

Field studies linking vertical processes with their driving forces and the resulting impact on biology and chemistry are important. I also work with regional- and local-scale numerical ocean modeling, including ice and biological modules, with the goal of improvement of vertical parameterizations as well as better understanding of fundamental exchange processes in Arctic regions.

Mats Granskog

Photo: Norwegian Polar Institute

Mats Granskog

Research scientist, Norwegian Polar Institute

I have been at the Norwegian Polar Institute since 2008 working mainly on sea ice geophysics related research.
But I have also been working on sea ice and ocean biogeochemistry and interested in the coupling of physical-biological-chemical processes in ice covered waters, and especially in (organic) carbon cycling in the Arctic Ocean. The core of my work is data collected during field work, and the subsequent analyses of samples and data. I have done many field work campaigns in the Baltic Sea, the Canadian Arctic, on Svalbard, and Antarctica.

In ICE Fluxes I am mostly interested to study how solar radiation interacts with snow, sea ice and the ocean, and how this changes with changing ice conditions and how this will impact the functioning of the Arctic system. I also want to look into how the ice associated ecosystem (mainly algae) respond to the changes in the physical environment in collaboration with ICE Ecosystems.

Another part of my research is using observations in Fram Strait to understand how effective remineralisation of allochthonous carbon is in the Arctic Ocean and look at the fluxes of carbon to the North Atlantic.

Vladimir Pavlov

Photo: Norwegian Polar Institute

Vladimir Pavlov

Research scientist, oceanography, Norwegian Polar Institute

I have worked as a physical oceanographer in Polar Regions during the last 40 years. From 1971 to 1998 I was employed at the Arctic and Antarctic Research Institute (St. Petersburg, Russia). Since 1999 I have been working at the Norwegian Polar Institute.

Most of my research projects have dealt with studying of the spatial and temporal variability of thermohaline structure and water and ice dynamic of the Arctic Ocean and Nordic Seas with the special interest in the Fram Strait, Barents and Kara seas region; modelling of the water circulation and sea level elevation in the Arctic Ocean; transport, transformation and accumulation of the contaminants in the Arctic Ocean and Arctic seas.

Edmond Hansen

Photo: Norwegian Polar Institute

Edmond Hansen

Research scientist, oceanography, Norwegian Polar Institute

I am an oceanographer and sea ice physicist. My main interests are observing the exchanges between the Arctic Ocean and the sub-polar seas through Fram Strait, and linking the variability of these exchanges to large scale change.

Under ICE Fluxes I'm working with the Arctic Ocean freshwater budget using tracers, and changes in the Arctic sea ice cover as observed by moored upward looking sonars under the Transpolar Drift where it exits the Arctic in Fram Strait. The work is carried out by deploying moorings across the East Greenland Current and on the North East Greenland Shelf region, and by doing annual/biannual CTD, LADCP and tracers sections. The work is carried out with Lance in summer, and by KV Svalbard and helicopter in winter.

I have been with the Norwegian Polar Institute since 1998.

Stein Tronstad

Head of Data Management Section, Norwegian Polar Institute

 

Sebastian Gerland

Photo: Norwegian Polar Institute

Sebastian Gerland

Research scientist, sea ice and climate, Norwegian Polar Institute

 I am a geophysicist and sea ice scientist. I study processes related to the mass balance and energy balance of Arctic sea ice.

In ICE Fluxes I work with the observation of the thickness of sea ice and snow with modern techniques. Detailed knowledge of ice and snow thickness is necessary for assessing the status of the sea ice in a region, for quantifying the sea ice and its role for radiative fluxes between atmosphere and ocean, and for climate modelling. Sea ice thickness is measured with electromagnetic techniques, from helicopter and on ice floes. In addition to thickness measurements, I also participate in the study of optical properties of snow and sea ice, and in investigating the role of melt ponds in the sea ice system.

Ole Anders Nøst

Research scientist, physical oceanography, Norwegian Polar Institute

 

Christina A. Pedersen

Research scientist, Norwegian Polar Institute

 

Angelika Renner

Photo: Norwegian Polar Institute

Angelika Renner

Research scientist, Norwegian Polar Institute

I started at the Norwegian Polar Institute in 2010 as Post-Doc in the ICE-Fluxes project. My background is in physical oceanography and sea ice research, both in the Arctic and the Antarctic, and I have participated in extensive fieldwork in both regions.

For ICE Fluxes, I have two main interests: Using the EM-bird, a helicopter-borne instrument, I study sea ice thickness distribution and development and investigate how these parameters are influenced by the environmental conditions. Looking into processes under the ice, I focus on mixing and turbulence in the upper ocean and directly underneath the sea ice and the transport of heat from warmer water layers to the sea ice to analyse the influence of the ocean on the sea ice cover. Both topics are challenging in themselves, but the real challenge starts when I try to combine the research on both!

Stephen Hudson

Photo: Norwegian Polar Institute

Stephen Hudson

Post doc, sea ice and polar climate, Norwegian Polar Institute

I study how sunlight interacts with frozen surfaces, and how these interactions affect the climate. My education is in atmospheric science. For my masters degree I studied the lower atmosphere in the interior of Antarctica and spent a year at the South Pole collecting data. I shifted to studying the interaction of sunlight and snow in Antarctica for my Ph.D. work, which gave me two more opportunities to work there, this time summer seasons at Dome C.

Since coming to NPI in 2008, I’ve continued focusing on sunlight, but now on sea ice in the Arctic. Using data collected on several cruises and field projects in the Svalbard area, I’ve been studying the sea-ice-albedo feedback and the transmission of sunlight through the ice and snow, which provides heat to the ocean and energy for organisms living in and under the ice.

Ola Brandt

Photo: Ola Brandt

Ola Brandt

Chief engineer, Norwegian Polar Institute

I am a geophysisist working as remote sensing engineer at the Norwegian Polar Institute. Main interests are non-destructive methods and techniques to detect changes as well as map material properties.

I finished my Ph.D (Application of Ground Penetrating Radar as a tool for Cryosphere Characterization) at NPI / University of Oslo 2nd of November 2007.

Olga Pavlova

Photo: Norwegian Polar Institute

Olga Pavlova

Research scientist, oceanography, Norwegian Polar Institute

I have worked at the Norwegian Polar Institute since 1999. I have participated in many projects, mainly focusing on the sea ice dynamic of the Arctic Ocean and marginal Arctic seas with a special interest in the regions of Fram Strait, Svalbard, and Barents and Kara seas.

In particular, I studied variability of sea ice concentration, ice extent and ice drift. I participate in studies of sea ice condition around Svalbard, in Kongsfjorden and Rijpfjorden.